Connect with us

Hi, what are you looking for?

CORONAVIRUS

NO TIME TO DIE! Brit Virus Cases RISE to 87 as BOND CANCELLED… and 70% of the population could catch COVID-19 

DEADLY Coronavirus is expected to spread across the UK even faster than first thought as UK cases jumped to 87 in less than 24 hours. 

As of 4 March, a total of 16,659 people have been tested in the UK, of which 16,574 were confirmed negative. 85 were confirmed as positive.

The new infections are in Trafford, Greater Manchester, Carlisle, Cumberland, South Ribble, Manchester, Liverpool, Oldham and London. 

Advertisement. Scroll to continue reading.

Experts have also suggested that a whopping 70% of the world’s population could get infected. 

Italy has also closed all schools and universities for two weeks to tackle the virus as the country is ‘overwhelmed’ by the deadly virus with 107 dying so far. The Italian government is also set to encourage the nation ‘not to kiss’ to beat the bug.  

 BOND POSTPONED 

JAMES Bond film No Time To Die has also been postponed due to the deadly coronavirus. 

“MGM, Universal and Bond producers, Michael G Wilson and Barbara Broccoli, announced today that after careful consideration and thorough evaluation of the global theatrical marketplace, the release of No Time to Die will be postponed until November 2020,” read a statement issued by the three parties.

Advertisement. Scroll to continue reading.

‘70% OF WORLD COULD BE INFECTED’

by ED HOWARD

ACCORDING to Harvard University epidemiologist Marc Lipsitch, between 40-70 of the world’s population could get infected by the coronavirus.

In his analysis, which he relayed to CBS news, he estimated that ’40 to 70 percent’ of the world’s population could get the virus, and for him, there’s no doubt that the virus will impact the ‘entire globe’ and that such an outcome was ‘almost inevitable’. 

‘That is a projection, so we’ll find out if it’s accurate as things go on’, he added, also stating that ‘there’s real reason for people to be concerned’. He also discussed that many of the infected wouldn’t become fatal, but it was hard to determine how many of those would be the case to avoid contagion. So far, there have been over 90,000 cases, with only 3,000 fatalities so far.

This comes as the amount of cases in the United Kingdom goes up to 85, and that the first British person has died from it, albeit on the Diamond Princess ship in Japan, as opposed to mainland Britain. All the while the World Health Organisation has admitted that the virus has a higher fatality rate than the flu. 

Advertisement. Scroll to continue reading.

I HAVE SYMPTOMS… WHAT DO I DO? 

COVID-19 is a new illness that can affect your lungs and airways. It’s caused by a virus called coronavirus.

What’s the risk of coronavirus in the UK?

The UK Chief Medical Officers have raised the risk to the public from low to moderate.

Health professionals are working to contact anyone who has been in close contact with people who have coronavirus.

What’s the risk of coronavirus for travellers?

There are some countries and areas where there’s a higher chance of coming into contact with someone with coronavirus.

Advertisement. Scroll to continue reading.

See NHS coronavirus advice for travellers.

Symptoms of coronavirus

The symptoms of coronavirus are:

  • a cough
  • a high temperature
  • shortness of breath

But these symptoms do not necessarily mean you have the illness.

The symptoms are similar to other illnesses that are much more common, such as cold and flu.

How coronavirus is spread

Because it’s a new illness, we do not know exactly how coronavirus spreads from person to person.

Advertisement. Scroll to continue reading.

Similar viruses are spread in cough droplets.

It’s very unlikely it can be spread through things like packages or food.

Do I need to avoid public places?

Most people can continue to go to work, school and other public places.

You only need to stay away from public places (self-isolate) if advised to by the 111 online coronavirus service or a medical professional.

Advertisement. Scroll to continue reading.

How to avoid catching or spreading coronavirus

Do

  • wash your hands with soap and water often – do this for at least 20 seconds
  • always wash your hands when you get home or into work
  • use hand sanitiser gel if soap and water are not available
  • cover your mouth and nose with a tissue or your sleeve (not your hands) when you cough or sneeze
  • put used tissues in the bin straight away and wash your hands afterwards
  • try to avoid close contact with people who are unwell

Don’t

  • do not touch your eyes, nose or mouth if your hands are not clean

Check if you need medical help

NHS 111 has an online coronavirus service that can tell you if you need medical help and advise you what to do.

Use this service if:

  • you think you might have coronavirus
  • in the last 14 days you’ve been to a country or area with a high risk of coronavirus – see our coronavirus advice for travellers
  • you’ve been in close contact with someone with coronavirus

Information:Do not go to a GP surgery, pharmacy or hospital. Call 111 if you need to speak to someone.

Getting help in Scotland, Wales or Northern Ireland

  • Scotland: call your GP surgery or call 111 if your surgery is not open
  • Wales: call 111
  • Northern Ireland: call 111

How to self-isolate if you’re asked to

If there’s a chance you could have coronavirus, you may be asked to stay away from other people (self-isolate).

This means you should:

  • stay at home
  • not go to work, school or public places
  • not use public transport or taxis
  • ask friends, family members or delivery services to do errands for you
  • try to avoid visitors to your home – it’s OK for friends, family or delivery drivers to drop off food

You may need to do this for up to 14 days to help reduce the possible spread of infection.

Read more coronavirus self-isolation advice.

Treatment for coronavirus

There is currently no specific treatment for coronavirus.

Advertisement. Scroll to continue reading.

Antibiotics do not help, as they do not work against viruses.

Treatment aims to relieve the symptoms while your body fights the illness.

You’ll need to stay in isolation away from other people until you’ve recovered.

More information

INFO FOR TRAVELLERS

Stay indoors and avoid contact with other people immediately if you’ve travelled to the UK from:

  • Hubei province in China in the last 14 days, even if you do not have symptoms
  • Iran, lockdown areas in northern Italy or special care zones in South Korea since 19 February, even if you do not have symptoms
  • other parts of mainland China or South Korea, Hong Kong, Japan, Macau, Malaysia, Singapore, Taiwan or Thailand in the last 14 days and have a cough, high temperature or shortness of breath (even if your symptoms are mild)
  • other parts of northern Italy (anywhere north of Pisa, Florence and Rimini), Cambodia, Laos, Myanmar or Vietnam since 19 February and have a cough, high temperature or shortness of breath (even if your symptoms are mild)

Use the 111 online coronavirus service to find out what to do next.

Do not go to a GP surgery, pharmacy or hospital.

Advertisement. Scroll to continue reading.

In Scotland call your GP or NHS 24 on 111 out of hours.

In Wales call 111 (if available in your area) or 0845 46 47.

In Northern Ireland call 111.

Lockdown areas in northern Italy:

Advertisement. Scroll to continue reading.
  • in Lombardy: Codogno, Castiglione d’Adda, Casalpusterlengo, Fombio, Maleo, Somaglia, Bertonico, Terranova dei Passerini, Castelgerundo and San Fiorano
  • in Veneto: Vo’ Euganeo

Special care zones in South Korea:

  • Daegu
  • Cheongdo

See maps of the specified areas.

This guidance is based on the recommendations of the UK Chief Medical officers. These areas have been identified because of the volume of air travel from affected areas, understanding of other travel routes and number of reported cases. This list will be kept under review.

For areas with direct flights to the UK we are carrying out enhanced monitoring. Passengers will be told how to report any symptoms they develop during the flight, at the time of arrival, or after leaving the airport.

Read more about what you should do if you’re asked to self-isolate.

Information about the virus

A coronavirus is a type of virus. As a group, coronaviruses are common across the world. Typical symptoms of coronavirus include fever and a cough that may progress to a severe pneumonia causing shortness of breath and breathing difficulties.

Advertisement. Scroll to continue reading.

Generally, coronavirus can cause more severe symptoms in people with weakened immune systems, older people, and those with long-term conditions like diabetes, cancer and chronic lung disease.

Novel coronavirus (COVID-19) is a new strain of coronavirus first identified in Wuhan City, China.

The NHS website has more information about how coronavirus is spread and answers common questions about the virus.

Recent government action

The government published its coronavirus action plan on 3 March.

Advertisement. Scroll to continue reading.

On 10 February, the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, Matt Hancock, announced strengthened legal powers to protect public health.

The Health Protection (Coronavirus) Regulations 2020 have been put in place to reduce the risk of further human-to-human transmission in this country by keeping individuals in isolation where public health professionals believe there is a reasonable risk an individual may have the virus.

Diagnosis and analysis

The UK is one of the first countries outside China to have a prototype specific laboratory test for this new disease. Healthcare professionals who are contacted by a patient with symptoms following travel to an affected area have been advised to submit samples to Public Health England (PHE) for testing. Individuals should be treated in isolation.

After the experience of severe acute respiratory syndrome (SARS) in 2003, PHE developed a series of diagnostic tests to detect any member of the family of coronaviruses. These have been used for several years, and were able to detect the first UK case of Middle East respiratory syndrome (MERS) in 2012.

Advertisement. Scroll to continue reading.

With the first reported publication of the genome sequence of a 2019 novel coronavirus, PHE was able to rapidly develop further specific tests for this virus, working with WHO and global network of laboratories.

When a clinician suspects novel coronavirus (COVID-19), they take samples from the nose, throat and deeper respiratory samples, package and send them safely to PHE Colindale. PHE can provide a laboratory result from this specific virus on the same working day.

PHE also has the capability to sequence the viral genome and compare this to published sequences from China, if a case occurs. This will provide valuable information on any mutations in the virus over time and allow an improved understanding of how it spreads.

Additional Reporting by GOV.UK, NHS England, Press Association 

Advertisement. Scroll to continue reading.

DON'T MISS

Media

THE UK is at risk of losing its leading position in the creative industries due to Government complacency as international rivals catch up, a...

Entertainment

LOVE Island bosses are said to be racing to buy branded condoms and water bottles after a cargo shipment went missing at sea. The...

Latest

TOMMY Robinson made his much anticipated return to Twitter this week, and it didn’t take the OG anti-Establishment rebel long to send the network...

PRINCE HARRY

PRINCE Harry has confirmed he’s not currently on speaking terms with his brother William, Prince of Wales or his father King Charles. The 38-year-old...

Advertisement

LIKE US ON FACEBOOK